Coffee Break


AEA Coffee Break Webinars (CBD)

We're pleased to offer a series of short coffee-break-length demonstrations of 20-minutes each that introduce tools of use to evaluators.

Via this site, you can view and PREregister for upcoming webinars (below) or sign in and go to the Webinars eLibrary to download archived recordings of previous Coffee Break Demonstrations.

If you are not a member, and would like to participate in the Coffee Break webinars, we offer multiple membership options that will allow you to register for any Coffee Break webinars that you wish for one year from the month of payment. The regular e-membership is $85 and gives you access to each coffee break webinar for free.  This is discounted to $30 for full-time students. These e-memberships include electronic only access to four journals. To upgrade and get one-year access to all of AEA's coffee breaks, please click here to join or contact Zachary Grays in the AEA office at zgrays@eval.org.

Upcoming Coffee Break Demonstrations

Lean Six Sigma for Evaluation - Greg Tong 

Thursday January 26, 2017 2-2:20 PM 

Process improvement methodologies, such as Lean Six Sigma, are often not considered related to evaluation, yet they offer defined, systematic approaches and practical tools for understanding and enhancing programs as well as for developing and evaluating metrics of success. This webinar focuses on three concepts from process improvement methodologies that are useful for evaluators: Customer, Process, and Value.

Greg Tong is currently the senior program manager for Planning, Evaluation, and Tracking at the Clinical and Translational Science Institute at UC San Francisco. He has a background in operations and product line management at firms such as Motorola and Hewlett-Packard, specializing in mobile technologies. He has a Masters in Public Policy from the University of California, Berkeley, a B.Sc. in Urban Studies from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Green Belt training in Lean Six Sigma.

Join this presentation by registering here

Emerging Trends in Evaluation: Webinar Series - Beverly L. Peters, Ph.D

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 2-2:20 PM 

American University’s Measurement and Evaluation program has identified several key trends in evaluation pertinent to its students and evaluators alike. In this first of two Coffee Break webinars, Beverly Peters discusses these trends, which will be elaborated upon in a series of free webinars organized by American University in 2017. Topics include:

  • Analytics and Data-Driven Decision Making Evaluators can learn from the ways that the corporate sector uses business analytics to understand, interpret, and display Big Data. Key aspects for the corporate sector that are useful for M&E include identifying what data is important, and finding ways to visualize it for consumption. (Dan Meyer, author of Putting your Data to Work)
  • Evaluating Health Programs: The Case of Tanzania USAID recently updated its Evaluation Policy and Operational Guidelines, streamlining evaluation requirements. This has helped USAID’s health programs in Tanzania to simplify implementation and evaluation processes. (Jennifer Erie, USAID Health Officer, Tanzania)
  • Using Qualitative Methods to Evaluate Impact in Violence Reduction Programs: The Case of Honduras Even though evaluators tend to use quantitative data to show program impact, we also recognize the depth of understanding that qualitative data can add to our analysis. In the case of violence reduction programs in Honduras, qualitative proxy indicators, such as perceptions of security, illustrated qualitatively the impact of Creative Associates’ programming there. (Noy Villalobos, Senior Director for Field Administration, Creative Associates)

In AU’s series of free webinars, experts will discuss these emerging trends, relating these to case studies in their fields. 

Join this presentation by registering here

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