Home

Greetings, Dear "Feminist Issues in Evaluation TIG" Members and Guests,

A warm welcome to our website and community of practice.  

The Feminist TIG brings together a dynamic group of evaluators, feminists and gender equality advocates who are united in their passion to promote gender equality and ensure that women’s experiences and voices are integrated more systematically into evaluation practice.

As your TIG Co-Chairs, we are excited to present this resource, where we hope you will not only find relevant information but also help us to strengthen and enhance its relevance for our membership. This platform also allows us to communicate with one another. So if you’d like to share/add a resource, start a thread or make any key announcements, you have come to the right place.

About us:

Svetlana has served as co-chair of the Feminist TIG for now the fourth consecutive year, and from where she was elected to co-chair EvalGender+, a global with a  mission to coordinate and maximize efforts in strengthening equity focused and gender responsive evaluation. She comes to the field of feminist evaluation through her M&E work, primarily the “M” of HIV/AIDS, environment and women’s empowerment programs. In recent years, her focus has shifted towards the “E” of donor-funded projects in agriculture, HIV/AIDS, food security and global climate change sectors. Growing up in a country that collected gender disaggregated statistics on a range of socioeconomic indicators such as education, employment levels and their rights, Svetlana understands not only the value of data availability but also its potential for shaking things up with the power of evaluation. Many forms of sexism still prevail in societies across the world and is manifested in women’s lack of reproductive rights, access to credit and health care, sexual harassment, discrimination in the workplace, and intimate partner violence. Hence the persistent challenges of conducting evaluation and going beyond merely recognising the different needs of women and men to applying feminist principles and approaches that recognise the complexity and responsibilities of governments as duty bearers to deliver the promises of internationally agreed normative commitments (CEDAW, Beijing Declaration, the Sustainable Development Goals, etc).  

Ghada joined as TIG Co-Chair in 2016; previously, and for two consecutive years, she served as TIG Program Chair. Her path to evaluation has not been linear but is nevertheless rooted in her personal and professional commitment to human rights, gender equality and social justice, which is what first drew her to the field of international development. In her experience, evaluation, and feminist evaluation in particular, is an important line of inquiry for bringing to the fore women’s voices and surfacing systems of discrimination and inequality that preclude them for participating in or benefitting from development interventions. Only by understanding power structures and embedded systems of privilege can we hope to transform the lives of women and girls in meaningful and empowering ways.

If you have not joined our TIG, please consider doing so. In addition to this platform, there are several entry points for your engagement throughout the year:

  • Contribute an article for the Feminist TIG Newsletter. The next deadline is October 15, 2017.  Please contact our Newsletter Editors: Kathryn Mathes [mathes@centerstone.org] and Brittany Schriver Iskarpatyoti [bschriver@unc.edu].
  • Submit a blog post for AEA365 Tip a Day. The Feminist TIG has a standing week that coincides with International Women’s Day each year. In 2018, this week falls between March 4-10. Contact our Program Co-Chairs: Jane Whynot [janewhyn021@uottawa.ca], Christine Fabian [fabian@wisc.edu] and Michael Bamberger [jmichaelbamberger@gmail.com.
  • Attend the annual Feminist TIG Business Meeting at AEA 2017 on Thursday, November 9, 2017, 5:15 pm – 6:00 pm (room TBD).

In the meantime, please keep an eye out for our exciting program of panels, multi-paper sessions and workshops at AEA2017. We look forward to connecting with you this fall in Washington, DC.

- Ghada Jiha and Svetlana Negroustoueva, Co-chairs, Feminist Evaluation TIG

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Speaking Truth to Power

October 28 - November 3, 2018

Cleveland, OH

Evaluation 2018
Conference: October 28 - November 3, 2018
Professional Development Workshops: October 28-30, 2018
Cleveland, OH USA 

Don't miss any FEMINIST session: the program will be posted HERE!

Whether the origins of the phrase Speaking Truth to Power are an American Friends Service Committee’s 1955 pamphlet on nonviolence, a Quaker saying from the 18th Century, writings by civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, a speech by ACLU president Patrick Malin, or even plays by Sophocles or Shakespeare, it has been used by social justice activists, clergy, academics, journalists, politicians, and evaluators to describe taking a stand, speaking out.

Join your evaluation colleagues in a lively, critical conversation about the role of evaluators and evaluation in Speaking Truth to Power.

As you think about how you might contribute to this important dialogue, consider these questions as catalysts for consideration about presentations, panels, posters, and even performances and other creative session formats for Evaluation 2018:

What responsibilities do we have as evaluators for Speaking Truth to Power? When? In what contexts or situations? With what consequences? At what risk or cost? To whom, with what expectations?

  • What is power? Who has it, and how can they best be influenced? What is the power held by evaluators and evaluation?
  • What is truth? Whose truth? How can we best discover these truths?
  • And, what is speaking? Whispering? Public pronouncements? Influence? Activism? And by whom on behalf of whom?

We look forward to engaging you in this important conversation at Evaluation 2018 in Cleveland, October 28 – November 3!

We encourage you to collaborate with other colleagues and TIGs and explore how a feminist lens can contribute to other issue areas